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Giant Japanese Spider Is Found In A Shipping Container | New Jersey Pest Control

Filed under: New Jersey Pest Control,NJ pest control services,Pest Control — Tags: — New Jersey Pest Control @ 3:05 pm January 23, 2017

Giant Japanese Spider Is Found In A Shipping Container | New Jersey Pest Control

It seems that there has been a lot of stories in the media lately about invasive insects and spiders arriving in America through shipping containers. You would think that since invasive insect pests are so devastating shipping officials would have figured out some way of making all shipments pest-free, but apparently that is easier said than done. Recently a shipping crew found a giant spider in a container from Japan.

Word has it that not a single member of the shipping crew was willing to trap the spider or remove it from the crate where it was found on account of its very large terrifying look. So the workers contacted an expert. Eventually an animal collection officer arrived to take care of the scary spider for the dock workers.

The spider turned out to be a large huntsman spider that is normally found in Australia. This spider can reach lengths of 13 or more centimeters, and their venom is not deadly to humans. Although these creatures are huge and scary looking they are completely harmless.

Which foreign insect or spider pest do you think is most damaging to North America’s ecosystem?

Can Insects Sense Pain? | Horizon Pest Control

Filed under: NJ pest control services,Pest Control,Pest Control NJ — Tags: , — New Jersey Pest Control @ 3:45 pm December 21, 2016

Can Insects Sense Pain? | Horizon Pest Control

Can Insects Sense Pain? | Horizon Pest Control

So can a creature as simple as an insect experience the physical sensation of pain? Can insects anticipate pain? According to Matan Shelomi, an entomologist, insects can sense damage being done to them, but they don’t experience emotional distress as a result of such damage. Insects also cannot recall past injuries that well, and there is an evolutionary advantage to the lack of attention that bugs pay to their own injuries.

The lifespan of an insect is not a long one, and therefore it is advantageous for an insect to avoid spending too much time wallowing in its own pain. It is also a good thing for insects that they rapidly forget about severe damage to their bodies because insects need to spend their precious time trying to reproduce. The rate of insect reproduction would decrease sharply if every insect took a week to rest and heal every time it sustained an injury. In other words, the feeling of pain is only felt in animals with long lifespans and animals that can put off mating until their health has returned.

Are there any examples in nature of either spiders or insects resorting to methods of self-care after sustaining an injury?

 

 

How A Variety Of Different Insects Prepare For Winter

This is the time of year when insects are going into chill-mode, or they just die. Some bugs hibernate over the winter, while other bugs will die, or succeed in finding a warm shelter during the winter months, such as your home. In any case, bugs tend to resort to a variety of different survival methods during the winter months, and some methods are more surprising than others.

Some insects, such as crickets, grasshoppers and praying mantises, leave their eggs behind for the winter before they die. Of course, there are many insects that succeed in migrating long distances, and into environments that are completely different from where they came from. For example, dragonflies, and the lesser-known tiny potato leafhoppers can migrate to other regions of the world with completely different and more hospitable climatic conditions.NJ pest control services

Other bugs, like the stinkbug and boxelder bugs, count on finding an indoor location in order to live out the cold winter. If these insects fail to find a warm location to chill out for four or five months, then they will certainly die as these bugs can only seem to survive in dwellings made for humans. However, many other bugs are content with the warmth that can be found underneath a rock. These are the bugs that you don’t need to worry about this winter, but keep an eye out for roaches since they prefer the comfort of your home during the winter months, and they make for bad Christmas guests.

Have you ever studied or even heard of a method of winter survival for bugs that was not mentioned in the above article? NJ pest control services