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Wolf Spiders Resort To Strange Mating Styles In Order To Avoid Being Cannibalized | New Jersey Spider Control

Filed under: New Jersey Spider Control — Tags: — New Jersey Pest Control @ 3:33 pm April 7, 2017

Wolf Spiders Resort To Strange Mating Styles In Order To Avoid Being Cannibalized | New Jersey Spider Control

Not too long ago a spider enthusiast by the name of Matthew Persons went searching for spiders in his backyard just for fun. Persons was hoping to find a rare spider, but instead he found three wolf spiders mating together. Although Persons found this site to be a strange one, he nevertheless dismissed the apparent three-way mating session as a rare occurrence. However, after Persons returned to the same area multiple times after seeing the initial instance of strange mating activity, he saw the same three member-mating sessions over and over again, and every time he stumbled across this unique mating act he noticed that these three-ways were all being committed by wolf spiders. Naturally, Persons wondered if this was a normal activity for wolf spiders. And if it was normal, then what purpose does the three-member-mating serve for the spiders survival?

After doing some of his own research Persons contacted some experts in the field of arthropod behavior. Persons quickly learned that he had stumbled upon a spider mating activity that even the most seasoned entomologists were not aware existed. The three-member-mating seems to always include two males and one female, which is possible since female wolf spiders possess a pair of reproductive organs.

Although it may be easy to assume that the three-member-mating behaviors demonstrated by wolf spiders occurs for no other reason than for pleasure, you would be incorrect. Instead the three-way mating among wolf spiders likely developed as a method to help male wolf spiders prevent cannibalization on the part of the female.

It turns out that after a female wolf spider chooses her mate, another sneaky wolf spider will jump on the scene and spread its seed as quickly as possible with the hopes that the female is still solely focused on her chosen mate. After the imposter plants his seed, the chosen wolf spider will, most likely, turnout the be the one that is cannibalized by the female–what a bummer!

Have you ever witnessed any strange spider-mating activities or rituals?

Are Wolf Spiders And Black Widows Similar? | New Jersey Spider Control

Filed under: New Jersey Spider Control — Tags: — New Jersey Pest Control @ 11:01 am March 22, 2017

Are Wolf Spiders And Black Widows Similar? | New Jersey Spider Control

The black widow spider is native to North America, as is the wolf spider. According to a variety of different pest control professionals from around the United States, many people call-in complaining about a black widow when, in reality, the spiders they were seeing were really just wolf spiders. So I guess the American public has a difficult time telling the difference between a wolf spider and a black widow spider. There are a lot of myths circulating about both of these spiders, which only causes more misinformation to spread about these two interesting bugs. So what makes the wolf spider different from a black widow?

Both the black widow, as well as the wolf spider, are found throughout the United States, particularly the east coast. Both of these spiders prefer similar wooded habitats, and there are many other similarities between the two, but the differences should be noticeable. For example, you will always know that you are dealing with a black widow when you spot a red or an orange hourglass shape on its abdomen. However, if you do not spot an hourglass then you may still be looking at a black widow, but it would be a male black widow. Most male black widows do have an hourglass shape on their abdomens, but the hourglass may be shaded with a more yellowish color. Sometimes male widows don’t have the hourglass shape at all, but the females always show an hourglass.

While the black widow is, well…..black, the wolf spider will be brown. The wolf spider may have obscure stripes or markings on its body. Wolf spiders are also quite a bit larger than male black widows, and they are often somewhat hairy. Seeing a wolf spider in your home, for example, should give any arachnophobe quite a scare, but black widows are not hairy at all, and with the exception of the hourglass design, black widows are completely jet black.

Wolf spiders will often prefer to avoid all contact with humans, and unless these spiders are mishandled or threatened, it is quite unlikely that they will bite. However the black widow is a different story. If you sustain a bite from a widow, you will want to go to the doctor, as its venom is particularly poisonous.

Have you ever spotted a wolf spider in your home before? If you have, was it truly hairy?